Education Framework Blog

Focused on the Future of Education in America

California Superintendents Tech for Schools Summit

Education Framework Inc. will be participating in the 2016 EdSurge California Superintendents Tech for Schools Summit
 
WHEN: Tuesday, July 26, 2016
7:30 am – 3:15 pm

WHERE: Computer History Museum
1401 N Shoreline Blvd.
Mountain View, CA 94043

The California Superintendents Summit is a state-wide event for senior education and IT administrators providing an inside track on emerging tech and trends. 

The focus of this particular event is on student data privacy (SOPIPA) and the Equity of Access with the new Williams Act Compliance, going digital and leaving no one behind, piloting products in schools and creating change around edtech.

Education Framework plans to share their student data privacy and parental consent solution, EdProtect, with interested attendees and discuss techniques that school and district leaders can use to simplify the student data privacy management process; saving time, money and increasing the safety and privacy of student data.

Interested in attending? Register here > (It's free for educators!) 

Bonus: There is also a welcome reception at Google the night before. 

WHERE: Google 
1345 Shorebird Way
Mountain View, CA 94043

WHEN: Monday, July 25, 2016
6:00 pm 

Hope to see you there!

EdSurge Tech for Schools Summit - Riverside, CA


We are happy to share that Education Framework will be participating in the EdSurge Tech for Schools Summit in Riverside, California, where we will be sharing our student privacy and parental consent software solution, EdProtect, with educators and administrators during the two day event. 

We are especially looking forward to this event because it gives us the opportunity to learn first-hand how the new privacy laws are directly affecting schools and districts in California. We want to better understand how administrators are handling their privacy obligations under SOPIPA and provide assistance to those looking for help and guidance.

Friday, January 22
7:45am – 3:15pm

Saturday, January 23
8:00am - 3:00pm

Interested in attending? Please visit here >>

Student Data Privacy Best Practices


Understanding that you need to do something and knowing what to do are two very different things. But simply breaking things down into smaller chunks often allows one to see more clearly, understand how the pieces fit together, and determine how to tackle each piece individually to achieve a positive end result. 

Today, we are utilizing this approach with regards to managing student data privacy. By breaking it down into simpler components, we are condensing a vast and often confusing array of information into a manageable set of guidelines for educators to follow. 

Based on best practice recommendations from the U.S. Department of Education Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) and other leading education organizations, we have assembled three easy-to-remember recommendations to help protect student privacy. They are as follows: 

1. Be Knowledgeable - Understand the privacy landscape and your legal obligations.

  • Know your student privacy laws. Federal laws include FERPA, COPPA and PPRA, but new state regulations are being implemented all across the nation, so it is important to know what is going on in your state. 
  • Create data inventories to fully understand the scope of information being collected and shared. 
  • Track which online and educational services are currently being used in your district.
  • Monitor privacy policies for changes.

2. Be Accountable Establish a data governance plan and guidelines to follow. 

  • Make a plan that addresses the full life cycle of data, from acquisition - to use - to disposal. Ensure the individual privacy and confidentiality of education records by defining rules.
  • Have policies and procedures in place to evaluate and approve online educational services. Determine who has purchasing authority and proactively define the scope and limitations of that authority. 
  • Use written contracts or legal agreements laying out security and data stewardship, data collection, data deletion, data use, data retention, data disclosure and data destruction provisions. 
  • Consider parental consent even in instances where federal law does not require. 

3. Be Transparent - Communicate your plan and engage parents in the privacy conversation. 

  • Post information about your student data policies, practices and usage on an easy-to-locate public webpage. Utilize parent-teacher dashboards, if possible. 
  • Be explicit about what information you collect about your students, and what that information is used for. 
  • Explain what, if any, personal information is shared with third party service providers, and how that information is safeguarded. 
  • Let parents know where they can get more information.

By following these recommendations, school and district administrators are taking necessary precautions to protect their students and their districts from harm. As mentioned in our previous blog entryPTAC has a wealth of resources available to help. They have even created a specific checklist for developing school district privacy programs. 


There are also automated student data privacy solutions available to help schools and districts proactively manage privacy obligations with transparency and accountability. Solutions like EdProtect take the guesswork out of managing student data privacy and offer an added layer of security, providing peace-of-mind for those tasked with protecting student information.  

Student Privacy 101: The low down on the laws of the land


Long gone are the days when protecting student information meant locking a filing cabinet. Today, with students using hundreds of different apps over the course of their education, software providers obscuring how they use data in complicated Terms of Service contracts, and an ever-shifting legal landscape, it can be extremely difficult for administrators, teachers and parents to know exactly what they need to do to protect their student data.

Over the next few posts we’ll be exploring the different factors affecting the world of student data. Our goal is to demystify the subject of student data privacy and help bring you up to speed so you can address this serious topic in your school district.

Today we’re starting by taking a current snapshot of the legal landscape. Federal laws like the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) work to ensure student data is only used for authorized purposes; protects that data from further disclosure or other uses, like marketing or being resold to others; and mandates that it is destroyed when no longer needed for the authorized purpose.

While these laws lay a foundation for educators and online operators to follow, they don't necessarily cover all aspects of data collection and deletion. For this reason, many states are now creating their own, more specific student data privacy laws to define what is and what isn't acceptable when it comes to the collection of student information in their respective states. 

Over the past two years, nearly every state has introduced its own legislation addressing student data privacy. In 2014, California passed the Student Online Personal Information Protection Act (SOPIPA), the first of its kind, which has since been used as the model for much of the legislation being introduced by other states.

Many of these are focused on creating greater transparency and accountability for educational data, clarifying the data and privacy activities of third-party service providers, and giving parents the ability to have a say in the management of their children's privacy. They generally fall into two types of approaches: prohibitive rules that seek to limit or halt certain types of collection or uses; or governance rules that seek to establish procedures, roles and responsibilities. In addition, numerous bills have established fines and penalties for data misuse and breaches to ensure accountability.

However, for everyone with a stake in education - teachers, parents, school & district leaders, and state & federal policymakers - the new challenge is knowing what all this actually means and understanding how to properly implement an effective plan to manage student privacy. Thankfully, there are resources available to help. 

The U.S. Department of Education’s Privacy Technical Assistance Center (PTAC) is a terrific resource for understanding your legal requirements and what steps you need to take to establish compliance. The Privacy Toolkit in particular provides a useful centralized depository of materials to guide schools and districts looking to improve the security and privacy of their student data. 

In addition, groups like the Future of Privacy Forum (FPF) and the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA) seek to create change from the industry side by encouraging members to sign the Student Privacy Pledge, committing to use student data in a responsible way. The pledge is intended to hold school service providers accountable and encourage effective communication with parents, teachers and education officials about how student information is used and safeguarded. 

Tools like EdProtect take it one step further and actually manage the process for you. Designed to protect students from data abuse, it ensures that schools and districts are in complete compliance with various federal and state regulations, engages parents in the privacy conversation, and lessens the risk of costly fines and penalties associated with the mismanagement of student information. Resources like this are crucial for helping administrators, IT staff and teachers proactively manage their student privacy obligations with transparency and accountability.

To learn how EdProtect makes your job easier, sign up for a free demonstration today.